January Garden Checklist

 

Citrus:

Water as needed - especially 24-48 hours before a freeze. Protect fruit grafted area if freeze will occur. Harvest ripe citrus if temperatures will drop below 28 degrees for four or more hours.

Fruits:

Major removal of twigs and branches or before spring. Weed as needed. Apply 6-6-6- or 8-8-8 fertilizer to Pears.

Flowers:

Annuals to plant are carnations, pansies, petunias, snapdragons, delphiniums, larkspur, dianthus, and foxgloves. Be ready to move less hardy bulbs inside. Most others, like ginger and amaryllis may have their foliage damaged during severe cold, but can be left in the ground and be expected to survive. Tulips, hyacinths, and daffodils can be planted now if you refrigerated them for 8 weeks to meet their chilling requirements.

Roses:

DO NOT Fertilize. Water as needed. Prepare sites for new plants 1/3 top soil, 1/3 dehydrated cow manure,1/3 peat moss, ½ cup super phosphate or bone meal. Roses can be pruned in late January. Remove leaves on the ground and strip leaves from plant to reduce disease problems.


Herbs:

Plant anise, borage, chives, chervil, coriander, fennel, garlic, lavender, marjoram, mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, sesame, sweet marjoram, and thyme

Lawns:

This is fertilize free month. Check the soil to determine water needs. When the grass blades fold it's time to water. Water once every 10-14 days in the winter. If mowing, keep your mower height at the highest level.

Perennials:

Water when surface soil is dry to the touch, make sure you have 2-3 inches of mulch around the roots, and water during the morning hours only. Outdoor plants require less water in the winter months.

Trees:

Most trees can have dead limbs removed, suckers trimmed off, old seedpods removed, lanky growths trimmed, and crisscrossing limbs controlled anytime of year. Don’t perform major pruning on any tree this month, especially flowering trees such as dogwoods, redbuds, azaleas, spirea and fringe trees that produce their blooms during the spring months. Water when surface soil is dry to the touch, make sure you have 2-3 inches of mulch around the roots, and water during the morning hours only. Outdoor plants require less water in the winter months. Begin transplanting plants in the landscape. Keep them out of the ground as short a time as possible. Water makes the difference between success and failure. Keep the plant moist but not soaking wet. Use dormant oil spray on dormant fruit trees and woody ornamentals that are having scale problems If a hard freeze is predicted, water lawn and ornamental plants 24-48 hours before the freeze to improve cold protection.

Vegetables:

English peas, beets, broccoli, potatoes, cabbage, celery, carrots, bunching onions, radishes, turnips, and cauliflower can be planted this month in North Florida.It is always best to have your soil tested prior to to determine what nutrients may be required for a successful crop. Plant seeds indoors or in a greenhouse for March plantings of peppers and tomatoes.

Selected from Florida Vegetable Guide by JM Stephens, RA Dunn, G Kidder, D Short, & GW Simone, University of Florida and Month-by-Month Gardening in Florida by Tom MacCubbin

 


Cabbage

Rebecca Jordi
Horticulture Agent IV
County Extension Director
Contributing Editor
email: rljordi@ufl.edu

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